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Posted on Jul 13, 2016

ESA Monash poll says spend more on education, not tax cuts

Australia will receive a bigger economic growth dividend in the long-run by spending on education than the equivalent amount on a tax cut to business. Spending more on education generates more human capital which is well understood to be a driver of economic growth.

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Posted on Jun 29, 2016

What now for Aussie investors post-Brexit? NAB

What now for Aussie investors post-Brexit? Brexit has triggered a new uncertain environment … market volatility will be high over the coming weeks and possibly months. Such events can provide buying opportunities when others are panicking. However, we advise caution until the picture is clearer.

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Posted on Jun 22, 2016

Brexit spells uncertainty for global markets, Pitcher Partners

Brexit spells uncertainty for markets: The odds of a UK Brexit are firming, and this is heightening the nervousness around the markets. Recent polls – and a flurry of betting – suggest that the chances of the UK exiting the European Union are increasing. Some European government bonds are trading at all-time lows as investors seek safety.

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Posted on Jun 22, 2016

What are the 10 most important levers to stimulate economic growth? CEDA

‘What’s the agenda for Australia’s growth?’ CEDA: With less than two weeks to polling day, it is vital that both major parties deliver sustainable, holistic plans for how they will drive growth in Australia. There are 10 key areas where action needs to be taken: innovation, competition policy, education, workforce participation, infrastructure, fiscal resilience, tax reform, federalism, workplace relations, and climate change.

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Posted on Jun 8, 2016

Private capital foray into mining will see deal cycle pick-up, EY

Private capital foray into mining will see deal cycle pick-up, EY

EY Q1 global capital raising and M&A report:  Cash and sustaining costs continue to be the focus for most players in the mining sector.  While well capitalised miners will continue to consider acquisition opportunities, we are now starting to see the much anticipated foray of private capital into the sector – a sign that the deal cycle will pick up.

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Posted on Jun 1, 2016

Reform can bolster growth despite poor economic outlook for Asia-Pacific, IMF

IMF Regional Economic Outlook: Growth in the Asia-Pacific economies is expected to decelerate to about 5.3% during 2016–17. While Asia remains the engine of the global economy, the moderation in regional growth reflects the sluggish global recovery and slowing global trade. As external demand remains relatively subdued and global financial conditions have started to tighten, domestic demand is expected to be a major driver of activity across most of the region.

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Posted on May 25, 2016

Productivity is vital for Australia’s economy in the Digital Age, KPMG

Productivity is vital for Australian economy: A new report by KPMG suggests that multi-factor productivity is vital for the Australian economy. The Digital Age will see routine manual jobs replaced by artificial intelligence, hollowing out the middle classes. Jobs will continue to be created, but will be lower-paid, part-time and precarious. This threatens social cohesion as well as the government’s income tax receipts. KPMG advocates a comprehensive program of productivity-raising reform. This includes tax reform, competition reforms and improved educational attainment for disadvantaged students to achieve inclusive growth and maintain social cohesion. Craig Emerson is an adviser to KPMG Economics.

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Posted on May 18, 2016

How obesity, ageing and new health technology place strain on Budget and healthcare providers, MUCHE

Pressures on health care: The federal government’s focus on the health care budget is driven by continued pressure on expenditure from population growth, ageing and quality care. While nominal expenditure growth has averaged just under 4% since the 2012-13 Budget, real expenditure growth has been closer to zero once adjusted for inflation and population growth. This means expenditure has not kept pace with greater health care needs from obesity, ageing and new health technology, placing additional pressure on the health care system and forcing governments to continue their search for greater efficiencies. Dr Henry Cutler is director of the Macquarie University Centre for the Health Economy (MUCHE).

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Posted on May 11, 2016

How Baby Boomers are changing market for aged-care providers, KPMG

Baby Boomers change aged-care market: By 2050 it is estimated that 3.5 million older Australians will access aged-care services each year, with around 80% of services delivered in the community. Informal care is declining, with more and more families prepared to pay for formal supports. Baby Boomers are entering the market with greater wealth and more demands than previous generations. This means aged-care providers will need to respond with a more consumer-directed focus. Those who communicate their value proposition clearly to the market and build partnerships and alliances with complementary organisations will be successful in a consumer-driven market. Liz Forsyth is KPMG’s global leader for human services.

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Posted on May 4, 2016

Cuts to corporate tax rate will stimulate economy, KPMG

KPMG says Budget ensures future investment: Treasury is less optimistic about global economic conditions than they were six-months ago. In the absence of stimulus, we expect Australia’s economy only to achieve sanguine growth as a consequence of declining net investment activity following the commodity boom. Non-mining investment has not picked up, which has meant the declining mining investment has been a drag on economic growth. Changes to the corporate tax rate will stimulate investment (most likely foreign investment), lifting productivity and real wages, and reducing unemployment as flow-on consequences. Brendan Rynne is KPMG’s chief economist.

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Posted on May 4, 2016

Grattan Institute outlines the role of government in the sharing economy

How governments can work in the sharing economy: The government can facilitate the sharing economy save Australians more than $500 million. Worries about peer-to-peer platforms are not groundless but should not be an excuse to retain outdated policies. These platforms will improve a flexible labour market. Governments must strengthen rules to prevent employers misclassifying workers as contractors, and bring platform workers into workers’ compensation schemes. Tax rules must be tightened to ensure overseas platforms pay enough tax. If governments act fast, consumers, workers and even the taxpayer can come out ahead. Jim Minifie is productivity growth program director at the Grattan Institute.

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Posted on May 4, 2016

Grattan Institute outlines the role of government in the sharing economy

How governments can work in the sharing economy: The government can facilitate the sharing economy save Australians more than $500 million. Worries about peer-to-peer platforms are not groundless but should not be an excuse to retain outdated policies. These platforms will improve a flexible labour market. Governments must strengthen rules to prevent employers misclassifying workers as contractors, and bring platform workers into workers’ compensation schemes. Tax rules must be tightened to ensure overseas platforms pay enough tax. If governments act fast, consumers, workers and even the taxpayer can come out ahead. Jim Minifie is productivity growth program director at the Grattan Institute.

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